Earth Science Project

Studying the earth can bring fascinating rewards. When you look at the earth from outer space, it looks like a round green and blue jewel. When you look down at the place where your feet are standing, it can be sandy, rocky, grassy, plowed black humus, or red dirt. It can even be water. Yes, the earth’s surface is composed of many textures. Inside are even more substances. There may be fossils of creatures, many of which no longer roam this earth. There are diamonds, gold, and other gems inside the earth. There are giant plates that move around and cause earthquakes, boiling rocks that roll out of volcanoes called lava, and steam that comes out of hot springs. Caves are also be studied.

Above the earth is a whole new range of study. Climates are studied; as well as thunderstorms, hurricanes, droughts, and tornados.

With all this information, what are some science projects that can be done concerning these subjects? Consider some of the questions you’ve asked yourself over the years about the earth.

First of all, you need to do research or get a perspective, in order to do any experiment. In fact, getting a perspective can be your experiment. For instance, you can trace the journey of Lewis and Clark across the western territories, and you can do it by satellite pictures. Go to http://www.edc.usgs.gov/LewisandClark/.

A map can be the key to all kinds of information. You can visit www.nationalatlas.gov for several online maps. Detail the geology of your local area with a map off of the national atlas. Then go out and find the rocks and minerals the map indicated. Display these. You could even research the rocks in reference to their value to the gem trade. Consider polishing some of them, or even wire-wrapping them.

At that same site you can view an interactive map of 2.6 million years of geology and topography in the continental United States. With these maps you’ll be able to see how things came to be what they did in an interactive series of maps called Tapestry of Time and Terrain. Now think of something interesting you can say about it, and say it in words and pictures.

A map can be the key to all kinds of information. You can www.nationalatlas.gov for several on-line maps. Detail the geology of your local area with a local map off the national atlas. Then go out and find the rocks and minerals the map indicated. Display these. You might even research the rocks in reference to their value to the gem trade. Consider polishing some of them, and even wire-wrapping them. Zebra mussels are also dealt with at this site. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are small, fingernail-sized mussels that originally swam in the Caspian Sea. The Caspian Sea is in Asia, which is half way across the earth from Lake Erie. Lake Erie is in Pennsylvania and New York, in the United States. How did they get to these big Lakes? What are they eating there? What’s so wrong with them in Lake Erie?

In actuality, persons in several different professions are very worried about these tiny clam-like crustaceans. You can find out why by looking it up on the internet.

And then, you can discuss what possible lesson we can learn from studying these little creatures.